The Best Way to keep Fresh Your Pillows

Yes, you have to clean your pillows. And if it’s been more than six months, they’re way overdue.

DOWN AND FIBERFILL PILLOWS

DOWN AND FIBERFILL PILLOWS

Good news! You can wash these kinds of pillows in your washer. For best results, we recommend washing two pillows at a time (to help keep the washer balanced) and using a front or top-loading machine without an agitator. If an agitator-style top loader is your only option, place the pillows in the tub vertically, so it’s less likely they’ll get wrapped around and damaged by the agitator.

If your pillow has a care label, definitely read that and follow the directions. If not or you’ve clipped off the tag, use warm water and opt for the gentle cycle. It’s also a good idea to add on an extra cold-water rinse and spin. Tumble dry the pillows on low heat, fluffing and turning them often. In the Good Housekeeping Research Institute Home Appliances and Textiles Labs, we toss in a few rubber dryer balls, like Nellie’s, to help plump the filling and keep it from clumping as it dries.

FOAM PILLOWS

FOAM PILLOWS

Unfortunately, you can’t put foam pillows in the washing machine, but if there’s a removable cover, you can wash that according to the care instructions on the tag. To remove dust from a foam pillow, vacuum both sides with your vacuum’s upholstery tool. If possible, dial down the suction level to make the job a bit easier to do. Or, tumble the pillow in the dryer on the no heat or air-only cycle for 20 minutes. Spot-clean any soiled areas with a cloth dipped in a mild sudsy solution. Rinse with a damp cloth. Allow the pillow to air dry completely before putting it back on the bed.

Some foam pillows include instructions for hand washing. If you choose to follow them, be very gentle. Wet foam is heavy and tears easily. To help pillows stay cleaner longer, use liners under your pillowcases and wash them monthly.

WHEN TO REPLACE THEM

No matter how diligent you are about cleaning your pillows, you will need to buy new ones eventually. How do you know when it’s time to toss? If you fold the pillow in half, and it doesn’t spring back into shape, plan for a shopping trip.

If you’re not sure if your pillow is still doing its job, ask yourself:

  • Is the foam or batting inside the form lumpy or bumpy?

  • Does your feather pillow have to be punched or fluffed up for support?

  • If you fold the pillow in half, does it stay folded?

If you answered yes to any of these, it’s time for a nice, new pillow. If you’d rather your old pillows didn’t end up in the garbage, consider how you can repurpose them. I give mine to my miniature schnauzer, for her bed — the ultimate in recycling!